Chef Fermín Núñez

Executive Chef Fermín Núñez represents one of Austin’s top restaurants, Suerte. With more than 12 years of culinary expertise, he was recently named among Food & Wine’s 2021 Best Chefs – a title he’s deemed a true honor to the craft he loves. Núñez’s steadfast dedication to honoring authentic Mexican cuisine, culture, and traditions through an elevated dining experience put the East Austin restaurant on the map with features on Netflix’s “The Taco Chronicles”, Bon Appetit “Brad Makes Tortillas,” The New York Times, and more.

Wine Selections:

Fermin Nunez Wine 3-Pack $160

Guimaro, Mencía 2020

Jolie-Laide Grenache 'Provisor Vineyard' 2019

Daniel Lionnet, Cornas 'Pur Granit' 2018

About the Wines:

Guimaro, Mencía 2020

Guimaro is a small natural grower making old-fashioned, artisanal wine on the steep slopes of Spain’s Ribeira Sacra. Their Mencía is bright, peppery, and refreshing, and a good bet if you like pinot noir or syrah.

Tastes like: Black cherry, nutmeg, and smoke.
How to drink: With a light chill alongside your favorite taco.


Jolie-Laide Grenache 'Provisor Vineyard' 2019

Jolie-Laide is California’s most boutique natural winery, producing less than 500 cases of wine per year, most of which end up in the very best restaurants. Jolie-Laide means "ugly-beautiful": in the context of these wines, it means they’re different but good. They use the Sonoma Coast’s cool climate to grow grapes native to more remote regions of France, like the Jura and Rhône. Though the grapes they use are many, their winemaking method is simple: grapes are picked by hand, foot crushed, and aged in old, neutral oak. The result is uncommon flavors that are bright, wild, and pure. This bottling is an organic whole-cluster grenache that tastes like fresh wild raspberry.

Tastes like: Ripe plum, black pepper, tobacco.
How to drink: Serve with a slight chill. This is good for saucy dishes like BBQ, steak au poivre, or pork chops and applesauce.


Henri Bonneau, Les Rouliers Rhône NV

‘Les Rouliers’ is Bonneau’s multi-vintage blend. It’s never exported to the U.S. and found only in France’s best restaurants (or the homes of Bonneau’s close friends). It’s a little bit easier-drinking than Châteauneuf, but still hearty.
Tastes like: Fig, licorice, and lapsang tea.
How to drink: This is lamb chop wine, but a Shack (or shroom) burger works too.